3 Steps for Finding the Right Tax Lawyer for Your California Business

Tax Act

Every year, businesses in San Diego come face to face with tax disputes from the IRS. And when it comes to taxes, there is very rarely such thing as an open-and-shut case. When your business is faced with anything from an audit to a battle with the IRS, it is essential to find a well-qualified lawyer to take on your case. Regardless of whether the case is minor or requires extensive documentation and work, having a well-versed California attorney on your side will ease the burden on your business to do extra tax law research, and let you get back to what you do best, which is run your company.

But as a business owner, you may be wondering where to start. Finding the right lawyer could mean the difference between a win and a loss against the IRS, so it is perhaps the most important piece of the tax case puzzle. Here are three things to look for when finding the right San Diego tax lawyer:

  • Narrow the focus – Depending on whether your case has to do with state or national taxes, you need a lawyer who is well educated in the right type of tax law. If possible, focus the search even closer and drill down to the attorney with the greatest amount of experience dealing with cases similar or nearly identical to your own. By understanding his or her qualifications and past experiences, you can ensure you are selecting the right lawyer for your case.
  • Don’t jump at the first lawyer you speak to – It is OK to interview a few lawyers before settling on the one who will fight your battle with you. Comparing law firms and abilities will help you make the right decision for your case, and keep you confident throughout the process that you chose the right law firm to take on your fight. With such an important decision to the success of your case, it is a good idea to go the extra mile and interview more than one firm.
  • Research your prospects – Once you have a few names picked out, take an extra step and do your own research on their backgrounds. Talk to the bar association or past clients to find out how easy the firm was to work with and what you can expect from it during your own case. Search the Internet for various forms of information, too. There may be some extra info not provided by the lawyer that is available online about his or her reputation and abilities.

Start your search by narrowing the focus down to which lawyers will be well suited to manage your case with the IRS. Then, be sure to interview more than one prospect and do your own research on the side to find the perfect fit for your specific needs.

Becky loves to write. Her favorite subject to write about is finances. If you’d like more information regarding San Diego tax lawyer, please visit http://www.allenbarron.com/

Chris Christie and Taxes At 10% Realistic Or Rediculous

Tax Act

A ten percent income tax for every citizen in New Jersey is Governor Chris Christie‘s plan. His belief is that to change the present economic crisis requires a radical approach to income taxes. A fiscal conservative he proposing to cut the state’s spending at the same time he is promoting income tax cuts.

Christie views himself as an economic visionary who is willing to take tough actions to pull his state out of its economic quagmire. His speaking engagements on radio, television, and at town hall meetings make him appear as a current Republican candidate for president, but his goal is the 2016 election. He is confident his plan will work for New Jersey and the Nation. In California, Illinois, and New York, Democratic governors are taking an opposite approach to his plan. They are raising taxes for all citizens and making sure the upper-class proportionally pay an equal share of their taxes. These Democratic governors want to lower the deficits in their states. Borrowing on empty bank accounts will only create more debt. States cannot be competitive if their economic standing is low and they have no money for their states infrastructure and basic needs.

Tax policies, which put on increased burden a state’s ability to be economically solvent are seen by many leaders as unrealistic. His plan which borrows from a bankrupt account may not be what New Jersey needs. His plan is radical, but similar to elective surgery the people of his state may want a second opinion.

 

 

Tax Refunds and Bankruptcy

Tax Act

When it comes to making the decision to go bankrupt, you need to be aware of just what the benefits will be.  If wiping your financial slate clean means that you will lose your house, savings, and assets, perhaps it would be best to consider other options.  When it comes to tax refunds and bankruptcy, here are some tips to protect the money owed to you by the government.

First of all, you should be aware that your tax refund can be a part of your bankruptcy estate, meaning that the court-appointed trustee has access to it and can part or all of it to pay off your creditors.  It is the part of the refund that was accrued the date of petition that belongs to the bankruptcy estate, therefore, the time of the year that you file bankruptcy makes a big difference to the amount of money you are due to receive.  If you submitted a joint married tax filing but only one of you is claiming bankruptcy, the joint tax refund may be at risk.

•    Change your exemptions – if you usually receive a large tax refund and are thinking about filing bankruptcy in the future, increase you exemptions to reduce the amount of money to be refunded.

•    Delay your petition – unless you are facing an immediate foreclosure, lien, or garnishment, delay filing for bankruptcy until you have received your refund then use it to buy necessities.

•    Submit a W-5 – Your Advanced Earned Income credit can be transferred to you on a weekly, monthly, or quarterly basis.  This ensures that you can receive it and spend it without losing it during bankruptcy.

Dealing with tax refunds and bankruptcy can be especially stressful as you obviously don’t want to lose any more than absolutely necessary.  Consult a qualified bankruptcy attorney to discuss options of how to hold onto your tax return.

For more information about filing personal bankruptcy, please visit claimingbankruptcy.net.